Worming expedition

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Peace
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Worming expedition

Post by Peace » Sun Feb 25, 2007 6:24 pm

Not Sentosa this time but Kranji. It's a mud flat with a stretch of rocks that are exposed during low tide. I was a little late there today and the tide has already started to rise, engulfing the mudflat steadily.

This is the place, looks pretty good for fishing too ya? ;) Plenty of baitfish can be observed near water surface and sometimes silvery white fishes can be seen leaping out of the water. Some are pretty big too!
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Anyway, I started with some simple rock flipping and saw some common crabs; most of them are very tiny, except for thunder crabs are slightly smaller than my palm.

This one is a tiny thundercrab
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The little red claw crab which I haven't been able to id.
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Some jellyish corn-like thing growing underneath a piece of wood
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And a tiny spider-like crab hiding within
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A cleaner view of the crab
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A molted shell of a small horseshoe crab
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A translucent goby that is pretty agile even without water.
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Now for the worms. :D I brought a spade this time so I can dig beneath the rocks to find more worms. The drawback is the worms I dug up are likely to be cut by the spade.

This is the most common worm there, you can find it under almost every rock you flip, they are pretty small and slim as well.
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This one looks exactly the same as the above but is yellow in colour.
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This worm is hard to photograph as it keep squirming. :mad: Notice it has fangs too! :shocked:
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Finally dug up what looks like a rag worm but too bad my spade halved it. :( This is the rear section of the worm
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This is the head section
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The last worm is interesting, but didn't quite manage to capture it. It's big, red and very flat; almost leech-like. It dug itself too deep into the less porus mud and close to a big embedded rock. I grab the worm with both hands trying to stop it but it broke its rear and escaped. :rant:

This is what I'm left with
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It started raining shortly and I had to pack up and leave. I will be back there another day to find that worm! :D Overall trip is fun but left me with muddy shoes and dirt all over me.

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Post by dBs™ » Sun Feb 25, 2007 9:46 pm

Nice work to introduce n identify the many types of worms on our shore :thumbsup: but...its so er...yucks! Imagine using both hands digging into the mud to get the worms ? How brave of u. :shocked:

Pay me a million n I still will not consider doing it. :lol: even with a spade. :lol:

Better luck next trip. ;)

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Post by Peace » Sun Feb 25, 2007 11:33 pm

I think it would be great if we could find out more about the different types of marine worms that can be found locally. We can also find out why certain worms are commonly used for fishing and why some are more effective than others. Alas, I'm not a worm user and is quite reluctant to handle them. :lol:

It is understandable that sarong worms and rag worms are commonly used because of their size and mass. Wat-wats on the other hand are not quite the same size as the former two but are just as effective and priced, if not better. Perhaps it has something to do with their availability as well.

I wonder how that red flat worm will fare when presented to fishes, it looks pretty 'delicious' to me. :mischieve:

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Post by domvonn » Mon Feb 26, 2007 10:37 am

last worm i think its a ribbon worm ... :)
http://mangrove.nus.edu.sg/pub/seashore/text/125.htm
I am a predatory fish keeper/fisherman/photographer.:)

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Post by desleyhan » Tue Feb 27, 2007 2:06 am

Peace wrote:I think it would be great if we could find out more about the different types of marine worms that can be found locally. We can also find out why certain worms are commonly used for fishing and why some are more effective than others. Alas, I'm not a worm user and is quite reluctant to handle them. :lol:

It is understandable that sarong worms and rag worms are commonly used because of their size and mass. Wat-wats on the other hand are not quite the same size as the former two but are just as effective and priced, if not better. Perhaps it has something to do with their availability as well.

I wonder how that red flat worm will fare when presented to fishes, it looks pretty 'delicious' to me. :mischieve:
Hi Peace,

You mentioned rag worms. Are they the ones mixed with saw-dust for sale in some of the tackle shops?

And what's wat-wats?

Cheers!

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Post by Peace » Tue Feb 27, 2007 7:51 am

domvonn wrote:last worm i think its a ribbon worm ... :)
http://mangrove.nus.edu.sg/pub/seashore/text/125.htm
Thanks domvonn. :thumbsup:
desleyhan wrote:Hi Peace,

You mentioned rag worms. Are they the ones mixed with saw-dust for sale in some of the tackle shops?

And what's wat-wats?

Cheers!
Rag worms are those you see people catch at the beach using bread mixed with water to lure them out. I have some pics on my site here. I'm not sure if there's more than one type of worms sold that are put in saw dust, but wat-wats are usually the one placed in a box with saw dust. They go for about 4 dollars per 100 grams, that's more expensive than live prawns. :shocked: But they're said to be very effective on grunters and breams. I only have a small pic of wat-wat here.

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Post by desleyhan » Tue Feb 27, 2007 11:10 am

Peace wrote:
domvonn wrote:last worm i think its a ribbon worm ... :)
http://mangrove.nus.edu.sg/pub/seashore/text/125.htm
Thanks domvonn. :thumbsup:
desleyhan wrote:Hi Peace,

You mentioned rag worms. Are they the ones mixed with saw-dust for sale in some of the tackle shops?

And what's wat-wats?

Cheers!
Rag worms are those you see people catch at the beach using bread mixed with water to lure them out. I have some pics on my site here. I'm not sure if there's more than one type of worms sold that are put in saw dust, but wat-wats are usually the one placed in a box with saw dust. They go for about 4 dollars per 100 grams, that's more expensive than live prawns. :shocked: But they're said to be very effective on grunters and breams. I only have a small pic of wat-wat here.
Thanks for the info Peace .... You have topics on catching wat-wats?

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Post by Peace » Tue Feb 27, 2007 1:46 pm

desleyhan wrote:Thanks for the info Peace .... You have topics on catching wat-wats?
Sorry, I don't have anything on it. I don't even know how catching wat-wat is like, it is impossible for me to write something on it. :sweatdrop: Perhaps someone else can shed some light on this.

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