Surf Fishing

For shore anglers casting far out into the sea.

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sgpu
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Surf Fishing

Post by sgpu » Fri Nov 12, 2010 9:57 am

difference between surf fishing and baiting. they are both the same principle, just one (baiting) smaller scale, and (surf casting) bigger scale, bigger gears.

with your current small scale set up, you can achieve a good distance cast, the bait never drop and most successfully lands you a fish. (even just that once) congratulations, your basics work. now you can multiply it by a different, and larger figure.

an example.
your current fish rod 6ft, you multiply it with a figure 1.6 you get close to 10.
your current reel 2500, multiply it with 1.6 you get close to 4000
your line poundage say 10lbs, multiply it with 1.6 you get 16

a usual 4000 reel max drag is capable of 7kg. 7 kilogram = 15.432 358 353 lb, lbs so your 16lbs line should suffice. but you do not do surf cast fishing with ordinary spinning reel and max drag it. if a 'great white comes' pulling, the next thing an angler would know is his or her tackle is already in the water. (great white for better analogy, hey, never say never) so how to overcome this problem?

buy a surf cast reel, or a spinning reel with bite and go release mechanism.
shimano: baitrunner and daiwa: regal bri plus

this feature allows anglers to relac one corner, while their fish rod is standing and the bait is doing what it do best in the water.
after cast, engage the lever. it frees the spool with a low amount of drag and a bonus screaming. all anglers love that sound. why? because it's fish on!
if a fish comes pulling, it will start taking line, and your fish rod would still be pivoting there safely. because your spool is almost free of drag.

go on down north, sincere. they are carrying the shimano baitrunner.

i would not suggest a baitcast reel for a beginner, but someday everyone might wish to start somewhere. here's why not.
it has a brake feature on the drum. it controls your line streaming everytime you cast. and most importantly, it brakes the drum the moment your line contacts the water. there is an amount of resistance when your sinker is in the air (weaker), compare to the sinker in the water (stronger). simple, imagine yourself flying, and swimming. which exercise requires more strength?
i don't have the formula for this :D

if the brakes is not adjusted, the drum will just keep spinning after cast, line is no longer streaming as fast as it enters water.
analogy, runner sprinting at the rear (drum), runner infront slows down (line streaming in the air slows down upon contact with water) = both runners will lang gar (drum will turn into a mess)

so your next gears you might want to experiment these numbers? :D

http://saltfishing.about.com/od/surffis ... 40521c.htm

i leave the rig and rod part to someone else to explain further. :p
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MrTurtle7
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Re: Surf Fishing

Post by MrTurtle7 » Fri Nov 12, 2010 1:45 pm

wow, This is helpful!! :D :D :nod:
But this make me feel as my line is a little too thick cause i use a 20lbs line :( Cause i hate it when my line snap due to some leaves or stick in the water :o :o
Generally what is the price range of 1 set of surf casting tackles?

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Re: Surf Fishing

Post by Chatellany » Fri Nov 12, 2010 2:41 pm

Sorry sgpu, I don't mean to question Ur advice but while I reading and asking frequent syrfcasters on how to get into Surfcast, they suggested a spool of roughly 260 m of 40 lbs monoline. And for the rod it'll be good if a starter can reach 12 ft. Correct me if in wrong pls, thank you.

As for shimano baitrunner, do you know the price btw? I was thinking if Ryobi applause 8000 will serve well as a reel for surfcasting, but can't really find the tech specs. Kindly advice.

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Re: Surf Fishing

Post by sgpu » Fri Nov 12, 2010 3:03 pm

i went to check of the model daiwa regal bri plus joe tackle selling $155 for a size 4500. was a little astonished by the weight of it. http://www.daiwa.com/reel/detail.aspx?id=197
26.8 ounce = 0.759 kilogram but again. nobody actually holds onto a surf tackle while at it. and even if it's 700grams, when a battle is engage, i won't be able to remember a thing than feeling muscle is aching.

i have heard seniors fighting sting ray @ CP 7 20yrs back. 30lbs braid 14ft surf rod 30mins or even more.

but carrying it can be painful. intended to buy it for my dad just now. ha. but he finds it too bulky. he happy i also happy. :D i save money!
MrTurtle7 wrote:wow, This is helpful!! :D :D :nod:
But this make me feel as my line is a little too thick cause i use a 20lbs line :( Cause i hate it when my line snap due to some leaves or stick in the water :o :o
Generally what is the price range of 1 set of surf casting tackles?
actually 20lbs could be overpowering. it's a good number to be on the safe side. my suggested number is working on a little bit of precision. but 20lbs isn't at all too much so don't worry.

however 20lbs line compare to a 10lbs. the diference matters would be. it's surface area. larger surface area = higher air resistance. (i am not asking you to use 10lbs you may if you want to) higher poundage or thicker diameter would compromised on your casting distance.

price range would differ as much as how much quality may vary.

i started with as cheap as $20 reel and $8 rod. i caught fish, and i cast non shorter distance than a 12ft telescopic. about 10years back. i experimented on all these factors. line diameter, monofilament, braided etc. i am 25 this year :D
then i understand what is quality about. you fight a fish with a $20 reel. drag is jerky, line snapped. handle is flimsy, you feel like line is going to snap any time. rod is heavy while you are spinning live bait. then you begin to suspect when will this rod break having only 4 guides on a 6ft rod. is the strength equally distributed etc.

with a set of affordable tackle, coupled with your experienced enough set of skills, when to tighten, when to loosen drag, any set will do. anyone can come forth and suggest the most ultimate set of tackle, but at the end of each fishing trip, zero catch? what good does it do?

may i suggest? do a search on shoreangler in FNR. why him? he landed fishes with facts. these details will suggest how far you want to go with your money. :D
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Re: Surf Fishing

Post by MrTurtle7 » Fri Nov 12, 2010 3:38 pm

Haha thanks for the advice, the thing is that i am using a 20lbs line for light luring set :o but casting wise seem okay to me.
I got a question about the reel bite and run thing, I don't get how it is suppose to work, i only know it allow the fish to take line without resistant.
Cause both my reel got a switch that allow the line to run free, but am i suppose to let it run free while waiting for the fish to bite?

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Re: Surf Fishing

Post by sgpu » Fri Nov 12, 2010 5:20 pm

MrTurtle7 wrote:Haha thanks for the advice, the thing is that i am using a 20lbs line for light luring set :o but casting wise seem okay to me.
I got a question about the reel bite and run thing, I don't get how it is suppose to work, i only know it allow the fish to take line without resistant.
Cause both my reel got a switch that allow the line to run free, but am i suppose to let it run free while waiting for the fish to bite?

oh that is a different feature. that lever which is common on every reel frees the whole reel, including the handle you crank. correct me if it does not make sense. if a fish comes biting, the handle is turning freely, in order to stop it, user might be hit by it. i free my reel whenever it is in storage or i am travelling.

that bite and go feature releases only the spool. actually frees the drag system yet engaging the clicker.

20lbs = bigger diameter = more air resistance = shorter casting distance (compare to lower poundage) = taking up more space of your spool = when you fight a giant you can max drag your reel = shorter fighting session
but
10lbs = smaller diameter = less air resistance = further casting = load more line into spool = precise drag setting = longer fighting session :D
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Re: Surf Fishing

Post by Peace » Fri Nov 12, 2010 10:37 pm

Interesting view on tackle scaling, sgpu. I can see where you're coming from as an avid lurer. :p For typical heavy surf fishing, 30-40lbs mono is the norm unless we're using braided. There's a reason for this despite theoretical values of line and drag power. Mono is kind of tricky to use, they are tough fresh out of the box but it tends to degrade with use and exposure to the natural elements.

The short length of mono at the end where you connect to the rig is often the first to weaken from repeated casting. Therefore, it's advisable to cut a short length off after a few trips of use. Then there's knots, depending on what knots, how many knots and how well you tie them will reduce the strength of the line. Also, mono degrades under sunlight (UV?).

There will also be situation where you need that extra line strength such as moving a stubborn stingray off the bottom, steering a big fish away from structure, and absorbing sudden thrashing of the fish when they surface. And if you're fishing from an elevated ground like a jetty where you may need to lift a fish up or preventing a fish from going under, the sacrifice of casting distance(thicker/stronger lines) will be well justified. :nod:

But under favourable conditions, I would say 20lbs setup for surf is definitely enough. :) Sorry if I didn't cover all the points but I just want to highlight on this interesting part of the discussion.

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Re: Surf Fishing

Post by MrTurtle7 » Sat Nov 13, 2010 10:21 am

Haha, notice that point about mono lines, they seem to be too stiff when i first got it and easily jump out of the spool making a whole mess and the stretching part of it makes me worry a lot about the line breaking. :cry:
I still prefer braided line as it is the first line that the tackle shop uncle introduce me to and its strength makes it seem much more reliable.

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Re: Surf Fishing

Post by sgpu » Sat Nov 13, 2010 3:27 pm

Peace wrote:Interesting view on tackle scaling, sgpu. I can see where you're coming from as an avid lurer. :p For typical heavy surf fishing, 30-40lbs mono is the norm unless we're using braided. There's a reason for this despite theoretical values of line and drag power. Mono is kind of tricky to use, they are tough fresh out of the box but it tends to degrade with use and exposure to the natural elements.

The short length of mono at the end where you connect to the rig is often the first to weaken from repeated casting. Therefore, it's advisable to cut a short length off after a few trips of use. Then there's knots, depending on what knots, how many knots and how well you tie them will reduce the strength of the line. Also, mono degrades under sunlight (UV?).

There will also be situation where you need that extra line strength such as moving a stubborn stingray off the bottom, steering a big fish away from structure, and absorbing sudden thrashing of the fish when they surface. And if you're fishing from an elevated ground like a jetty where you may need to lift a fish up or preventing a fish from going under, the sacrifice of casting distance(thicker/stronger lines) will be well justified. :nod:

But under favourable conditions, I would say 20lbs setup for surf is definitely enough. :) Sorry if I didn't cover all the points but I just want to highlight on this interesting part of the discussion.
i started fishing with a lot of questions. i thought by sharing with how much i understand today is one way how i can return to the fishing way of life.
totally agree with how terrorising UV ray can get. all line can't chafe, but monofilament can't seem to take the slightest.
braid provides instantaneous feel should a creature come nibbling.

recently watched 'hooked' on nat geo wild. in thai fresh water, a record whopper ray was landed by about 6 anglers, taking turns. it was amazing, and i really love to challenge one.
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Re: Surf Fishing

Post by sgpu » Sat Nov 13, 2010 3:29 pm

MrTurtle7 wrote:Haha, notice that point about mono lines, they seem to be too stiff when i first got it and easily jump out of the spool making a whole mess and the stretching part of it makes me worry a lot about the line breaking. :cry:
I still prefer braided line as it is the first line that the tackle shop uncle introduce me to and its strength makes it seem much more reliable.

monofilament line has this effect call 'line memory' braided has it too, but braided gets seasoned. =)
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